Introduction to Drywall Repair Materials

There’s a catch to drywall repair that everyone should know before attempting to “do-it-yourself” for the first time. Drywall repair is easy to do, but it is also easy to do a tremendously bad job. For this reason, a simple introduction to drywall repair materials and tools is a great place to start on your path toward patching and painting your property’s interior structural damages. But remember, it’s not just practice that makes perfect, it is also knowledge, especially in terms of drywall repair. So continue your research and learn all that you can about drywall work before getting started on your personal projects. Continue reading to review some common industry knowledge for drywall repair.

Drywall Compound

Also called drywall “mud”, there are two common types of joint compound used to repair and patch: light-weight and all-purpose. Both are easy to work with and retain a room-temperature shelf-life of 9 months. The most important tip for buying drywall compound is to buy enough. For large projects, expect to purchase 4.5 gallon bucket of material.

For smaller projects, you can get away with a one gallon bucket, but you may be paying close to the same amount for a larger bucket. If you think you might have future work in the next 9 months, it is more cost-effective to go with the larger bucket. If not, go with the smaller amount so to not waste any material.

Spackle and Plaster

Many people are confused about the difference among drywall compound, spackle, and plaster. The differences are subtle, and hardly noticeable to the average layperson, but they do exist. Compound, joint compound, or drywall mud all refer to the same product, and used mostly for larger drywall and gypsum board projects that require more durability, namely to cover joints between panels.

Spackle is very similar to joint compound, but used mostly for small household repairs for plaster and drywall. Plaster is a type of wall material found mostly in older or historic buildings. It is a more time-consuming approach to wall repair in comparison to spackle.

Drywall Repair Tools

You can purchase drywall repair kits that come with virtually all the essentials for drywall patching and repair. Kits range in quantity, size, and price, but common ones generally include 2-3 flexible knives, a utility knife, an insider-corner knife, hammer, screwdriver, saw, drill, nails, and screws. But drywall repairs also require additional materials depending on the needs of the project.

You can purchase all of the above-listed materials at any local hardware or home improvement store. Ask a store attendant to point you in the right direction, and give advice on the most reliable products. Talk to a licensed drywall contractor for expert advice on household drywall repairs, drywall projects, drywall replacement, and more. They can even take the weight off your shoulders by getting the job done faster, better, and at a price that won’t make you think twice!

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Top Home Siding Material Options And How To Select The Best

House siding does not only protect the home from different elements, but it can also dramatically boost the appearance of your home. To get the best results when installing, repairing or replacing siding, you should factor in weather and climate in your locality because they are factors that can negatively affect the value of the home. Durability, maintenance, energy efficiency, affordability and aesthetics are the other very important factors you should consider when choosing siding for your home. Water resistant materials will of course translate to longer life spans and reduce replacement needs so have this in mind too when choosing the perfect siding material for your home.

1. Wood

Wood siding gives you the flexibility of choosing wood grade and species for your desired finished look. Grades that are more expensive with few defects and knots will give your home that natural beauty that shows through clear stain or a stain that is semi-transparent. If you wish to paint opaque stain, then less expensive grades will be just as good. Wood siding is easy to cut and shape and installation is also easy to do. The aesthetics of wood are superior and with proper maintenance you will enjoy years of service. It is however one of the most expensive siding materials you can choose for your home and you will need to repaint or re-stain every few years.

2. Fiber-cement

This is siding made from a mix of cement and wood fibers, sand and clay. It is a material that is gaining popularity among consumers because of the rugged durability, weather resistance and low maintenance. The liquid mixture makes it easy for the siding to be molded in such a way that it resembles painted wood, masonry or stucco. This material is fire resistant, rot free and termite proof. After installation of pre-finished fiber cement you will not need to paint, but you still can paint when you feel a need to change the colors. It is resistant to thermal contraction and expansion, so it holds up caulk and paint pretty well. It is, however a heavy material and specialty tools and techniques are required for best results.

3. Vinyl

New homes are now sporting this type of siding because it is durable, tough and it also comes in a wide range of colors and styles to match individual preferences. The color permeates through and does not reveal scratches or nicks. The standards today ensure this type of siding maintains shape even in extreme temperatures, retains color and resists high winds. The major advantages of vinyl include being lightweight hence installations are speedy and the fact that it is a material that can be retrofitted over the existing siding. Vinyl also comes with little maintenance, but with standard panels you could end up having visible seams that are not very attractive. You can however choose panels that are extra-long to eliminate the seams and have a beautiful smooth finish.

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Importance Of Installing An Adequate Ventilation System

A clean indoor environment is of great importance due to the many hours that you spend within your home. The indoor air that you breathe in should be fresh and clean to ensure that you do not get any respiratory complications. The only way your home can have a continuous supply of fresh air is through effective home ventilation. As long as your home has adequate ventilation, condensation which leads to a damp home will not take place. The structure of your home will not suffer decay and will remain intact for a long time.

Importance Of Ventilating Your Home

If your home is damp and has a musty smell, ventilation can help to keep your home dry and ensure that the indoor air is fresh and clean. Ventilation gets rid of the stale indoor air and replaces it with fresh air from the outside. There are different methods of ventilating your home such as the natural method. Natural ventilation is the free flow of air into the home from doors, windows and openings around the building. However, if you are living in a home that is insulated, you will need to have a mechanical ventilation system that will air your home.

The Use Of Mechanical Ventilation

You can opt to use mechanical ventilation in order to effectively get rid of stale air from your home. You can decide to install fans in the specific location where moisture build up and pollution is originating from in the home. For instance, you can install fans in the bathroom, kitchen or on the sub floor to get rid of moist air and replace it with drier air from outside. You can also decide to use whole house ventilation where the entire house is ventilated by a set of fans which bring in the fresh air and duct systems which get rid of the stale air.

Heat Recovery Ventilator

A heat recovery ventilator (HRV) is an efficient home ventilation system which captures the heat from the outgoing stale air to heat up the incoming fresh cold air. A HRV is made up of a fan which brings in the fresh air and another fan which gets rid of the stale air. The system has a core where the exchange of heat from the stale air to the clean air takes place.

The core where the transfer of heat takes place has a thin route through which the stale and fresh air passes. However, the stale and fresh air does not mix at any point during the heat transfer. An HRV is able to retain about eighty-five percent of the heat from the outgoing stale air which makes it an efficient ventilation method. During the warm summer days, the HRV can take the heat from the incoming air and transfer it to the stale outgoing air thus allowing you to enjoy the cool clean air.

Contacting A Ventilation Expert

In order to get the best home ventilation system, it is a good idea to …

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